St. Agnes, Isles of Scilly - JHLPHOTOGRAPHY

St Agnes, Isles of Scilly - June 02, 1994

The Old Lifeboat Station and Church at Periglis, Lower Town, St Agnes, Isles of Scilly.

St Agnes' Lifeboat Station was situated Periglis, St Agnes, Isles of Scilly and was operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution from 1891 to 1920.

The lifeboat station and slipway have been identified by the Isles of Scilly Council as a Building of Local Significance.

The station opened in 1891 with a single slipway. A new slipway was provided in 1904 at a cost of £5,000 (equivalent to £529,000 in 2018) to the designs of the Institution’s Architect, W.T. Douglass.

From the back of the boat house to the toe of the slip it was 1,068 feet (326 m). It was built of Jarrah wood from Western Australia, bolted to granite and concrete pillars, with the exception of a short piece at the upper end, built on the rocks.

Two rails ran the entire length of the slip, on which rested the double bogey trolley that carried the boat. Rails were also laid down the old slip which could be used at high tide.[5]

On 13 December 1907, the THOMAS W LAWSON of Boston was in distress off Annet. The St Agnes Lifeboat put William Thomas Hicks on board to act as pilot. But the schooner foundered at Minmanueth and he was lost together with fifteen of the vessel’s crew. His son, Frederick Charles Hicks, put off with seven other men in the gig SLIPPEN which rescued the schooner’s captain and engineer form Hellweather rock.
Frederick Charles Hicks was awarded the RNLI Silver Medal for bravery, when swimming from a gig to save the captain of the Thomas W Lawson. The United States government gave him a gold watch, and gold medals to all the crew of the gig SLIPPEN.

SCY0440ST AGNESST AGNES ISLANDISLAND OF ST AGNESISLES OF SCILLYSCILLYSCILLY ISLESSCILLONIAATLANTIC OCEANENGLANDUKCORNWALLKERNOWwww.jhluxton.comjohn h. luxton photographyPERIGLISroyal national lifeboat institutionST AGNES LIFEBOAT STATIONABANDONED LIFEBOAT STATIONDISUSED LIFEBOAT STATIONLOWER TOWN1994